Summer Reading Preview at Park Road Books / full list of books w/summaries,

Last month (on May 9, 2022), Sally Brewster, owner of Park Road Books, curated a list of must-reads for the new Summer season.

Here are 19 titles to get you through summer and beyond!

 

 

Any Other Family by Eleanor Brown  (7/22, G.P. Putnam’s Sons, $27.00, HC). Three sets of parents find themselves intertwined after adopting four biological siblings, having committed to keeping the children as connected as possible. / Women’s Fiction

 

Bartender’s Cure: A Novel by Wesley Stratton (6/22, Flatiron Books, $27.99, HC). Samantha is a bartender, at the perfect neighborhood bar. A debut novel, filled with cocktail recipes and bartending tips and tricks. / Debut Fiction, Women’s Fiction

 

By the Book by Jasmine Guillory (5/22, Hyperion, $15.99 TP). Isabel is an overworked/underpaid assistant book editor. When she volunteers to work with a high-profile author, she finds not only a possible promotion, but love. / Romantic Comedy; BIPoC Fiction

 

Child: A Memoir by Judy Goldman (5/22, U. of SC Press, $19.99, TP). The story of Judy’s relationship with Mattie Culp, the Black woman who worked for her family as a live-in maid and helped raise her. It is also the story of Mattie’s child, who was left behind to be raised by someone else. / Memoir, African-American History

 

I Wish for You by David Wax (4/22, Roaring Brook Press, $18.99 HC). From courageous lions and wise owls to playful dolphins and wolves finding their voices, this lushly illustrated book explores the values we can draw from the wondrous and inspiring natural world around us. / Picture Book; New Baby; Animal Picture Books

 

Last to Vanish by Megan Miranda (7/22, Scribner, $27.99 HC). This book opens with the disappearance of a journalist who is investigating a string of vanishings in the resort town of Cutter’s Pass—will its dark secrets finally be revealed? / Thriller; Suspense

 

Lessons in Chemistry (4/22, Doubleday $29.00 HC). In 1960s California, Elizabeth Zott is a one-of-a-kind scientist. But her career takes a detour when she becomes the unlikely star of a beloved TV cooking show. / Feminist Fiction; Humor

 

Love of My Life by Rosie Walsh (3/22, Pamela Dorman,  $28.00 HC). Emma loves her husband Leo and their young daughter Ruby. But almost everything she’s told them about herself, even her name, is a lie.When the very darkest moments of Emma’s past finally emerge, she must somehow prove to Leo that she really is the woman he always thought she was…/ Women’s Fiction; Suspense/Thriller

 

Love Marriage: A Novel by Monica Ali (5/22, Scribner, $27.99 HC). 26-year old med student Yasmin Ghorami is engaged to Joe Sangster, whose mother is a famous feminist. And as the wedding draws near, misunderstandings, infidelities, and long-held secrets upend both Yasmin’s relationship and that of her parents, a “love marriage,” according to the family lore that Yasmin has believed all her life. / Fiction; Cultural Heritage; Family Life

 

Marrying the Ketchups: A Novel by Jennifer Close (4/22, Knopf, $28.00 HC). A comedy of manners about three generations of a Chicago restaurant family and the deep-fried, beer-battered, cream cheese-frosted love that feeds them all. / Family Life; Fiction

 

Portrait of a Thief: A Novel by Grace D. Li (4/22, Tiny Reparations Books, $26.00 HC). Ocean’s Eleven meets The Farewell in Portrait of a Thief, this heist novel is inspired by the true story of Chinese art vanishing from Western museums; about diaspora, the colonization of art, and the complexity of the Chinese American identity./ Crime; Asian-American Fiction; Mystery

 

Remarkably Bright Creatures: A Novel by Shelby Van Pelt (5/22, Ecco, $27.99 HC). A widow takes a night shift at the Sowell Bay Aquarium. There, she becomes acquainted with Marcellus, a giant Pacific octopus. Marcellus knows more than anyone can imagine but wouldn’t dream of lifting one of his eight arms for his human captors—until he forms a remarkable friendship with Tova./ Literary Fiction; Animals

 

Rogues: True Stories of Grifters, Killers, Rebels & Crooks by Patrick Radan Keefe (6/22, Doubleday $30.00 HC). Twelve works of literary journalism. Subjects include: the intricacies of forging $150,000 vintage wines, exploring Vietnam with Anthony Bourdain, bringing down a black market arms merchant. / True Crime / Biography & Autobiography

 

Skinship: Stories (4/22 Vintage $17.00 TP). This debut collection centers on a constellation of Korean-American families. Through an array of lives, Choi explores where first and second generations either clash or find common ground, where meaning falls in the cracks between languages, where relationships bend under the weight of tenderness and disappointment, where displacement turns to heartbreak. / Asian-American Fiction; Family Life; Short Stories

 

This Time Tomorrow: A Novel by Emma Straub (5/22, Riverhead, $28.00 HC). On the eve of her 40th birthday, Alice finds herself back in 1996, reliving her 16th birthday. But it isn’t just her adolescent body that shocks her, or seeing her high school crush, it’s her dad: the vital, charming, 40-something version of her father with whom she is reunited. / Family Life; Science Fiction

 

 

Trust by Hernan Diaz (5/22, Riverhead, $28.00 HC). In the 1920s, Wall Street tycoon Benjamin Rask and his wife, Helen, had a life of seemingly endless wealth and extravagance. But at what cost did they acquire their immense fortune? This is the mystery at the center of Bonds, a successful 1937 novel. Yet there are other versions of this tale of privilege and deceit. A novel within a novel. / Historical Fiction

 

Unlikely Animals: A Novel by Anne Harnett (4/22, Ballantine, $28.00HC). A medical school dropout comes back to her NH hometown to care for her father, who is dying from a mysterious brain disease. He’s also having visions of ghosts and small animals. Set against the backdrop of a town in the throes of an opioid crisis. / Family Life; Literary; Humorous

 

Upgrade: A Novel by Blake Crouch $28.00 (7/22, Ballantine, HC). Logan Ramsay feels a little… sharper. Better able to concentrate. Better at multitasking, memorizing…Logan’s genome has been hacked./ Sci-Fi Thriller

 

When Women Were Dragons by Kelly Barnhill (5/22, Doubleday $28.00 HC). A fantasy novel, set in 1950s America. Thousands of women have spontaneously transformed into dragons, exploding notions of a woman’s place in the world and expanding minds about accepting others for who they really are. / Coming of Age; Fantasy; Feminist Fiction



 Park Road Books in Charlotte, NC, is the partnered bookstore for WNBA-Charlotte Chapter. We are thrilled to have this seasonal Reading Preview event with them. For self-published authors, one of the benefits of being a WNBA-Charlotte Chapter member is waived shelving fees at PRB.  

JOIN OR RENEW WITH THE WNBA-CHARLOTTE  a volunteer association dedicated to books and the people who work with and love them, WNBA-Charlotte is focused on helping the Queen City’s literary community thrive. Please join us again for the 2022-23 year

Benefits include:

  • Free stocking for self published authors at Park Road Books, Charlotte, NC

  • Access to our national book club (monthly meetings on Facebook)–a great way to share and discuss books with fellow book lovers.

  • Listing in blogrolls on WNBA websites, locally and nationally.

  • Discounts on fellow members’ editing, marketing, and publicity services.

  • Writing and publicity opportunities in The Bookwoman, WNBA national newsletter.

  • Members-only access to the WNBA national website and opportunities to network with members in all chapters.

*Remember, as a chapter member, self-published authors are waived their shelving fees at Park Road Books. One of our members member benefits,  special discounts for current WNBA-Charlotte members. Go to their PRB Consignment Program page section and learn more.

Join us on May 9th at Park Road Books

The WNBA-Charlotte Chapter and Park Road Books

invites everyone to our

Great Spring/Summer Reads Preview

Monday, May 9th / 6:30-8:00pm
at
Park Road Books, 4139 Park Rd., Charlotte

 

After two years, this annual In-Person event is back! Join us as PRB Owner Sally Brewster shares her list of reads for the seasons, created just for us!

Enjoy some wine & cheese and great book conversation, and leave with curated list of choice titles. Open to all!

 

@parkroadbooks  @wnba_charlotte 

 

Join us on Oct 12th at Mugs Charlotte

Chapter Members, join us LIVE for our
GREAT GROUP READS BOOKCLUB MEETUP

Tuesday, October 12th, 7:00pm
Mugs Coffee, 5126 Park Rd, Charlotte

 

Please rsvp if you wish to attend or vote on books.

RSVP HERE

Join us in picking our book club choices for December 2021 to September 2022. GGR Chair Kristen Knox will give an informative run-down of the newest Great Group reads list, which will be the basis of all titles for the calendar. We’ll decide what books to read and when.

 

WHAT IS GREAT GROUP READS?
Great Group Reads (GGR) is an initiative started by WNBA National in 2009. Books chosen are a resource for book clubs, reading groups, bookstores and libraries.

Titles for GGR are selected on the basis of their appeal to reading groups for whom they are certain to open up lively conversations about an array of timely and provocative topics. The GGR Selection Committee focuses attention on under-represented books from independent presses and mid- list releases from larger houses. 


WHEN DOES THE CHARLOTTE CHAPTER BOOKCLUB MEET?

After books are selected and assigned, the WNBA-Charlotte’s Bookclub will meet the first Tuesday of every month, from November to September. Meetups will be from 7-8:30pm at Mugs Coffee Shop. Should there be a need to, for social distancing purposes, meet ups will be virtual on Zoom and chapter members will know in advance. Titles are picked and scheduled at the October 12th meetup. The list and schedule distributed to members asap.

 

WHAT ARE THE 2021 TITLES?
There were 20 titles selected, in the genres of fiction, short stories and memoir (we will choose to read to).

After Francesco by Brian Malloy (John Scognamiglio Books, HC) LGBT, Contemporary Fiction, Own Voices, AIDS Epidemic

All Sorrows Can Be Borne by Autumn Stephens (Rare Bird Books, HC) Saga, Coming-of-Age, Family Life

All the Young Men by Ruth Coker Burks (Grove Press, TP) Memoir, LGBT, Aids Epidemic, Personal Activism

The Baddest Girl on the Planet by Heather Frese (Blair, HC) Southern Fiction, Small Town/Rural Fiction

A Girl is a Body of Water by Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi (Tin House Books, TP) Coming-of-Age, Japanese History, Historical Fiction

Hell of a Book by Jason Mott (Dutton, HC) African-American Literary Fiction, Southern U.S.

Mona at Sea by Elizabeth Gonzalez James (Santa Fe Writer’s Project, TP) Coming of Age, Latinx

The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai (Algonquin, TP) Coming of Age,Vietnamese, Cultural Heritage

No Hiding in Boise by Kim Hooper (Keylight Books, TP) Literary, Psychological

The One Hundred Years of Lenni and Margot: A Novel by Marianne Cronin (Harper Perennial, TP) Friendship, Women’s Fiction

The Paris Library by Janet Skeslian Charles (Atria, HC) Historical [WWII] Fiction, Women’s Fiction

The Parted Earth by Anjali Enjeti (Hub City Press, HC) Literary, Asian-American, Cultural Heritage

The Portrait: A Novel by Ilaria Bernardini (Pegasus Books, HC) Women’s Fiction, Family Life

The Prince of Mournful Thoughts and Other Stories by Caroline Kim (U. Of Pittsburgh Press, HC) Asian-American, Short Story Collection

A Recipe for Daphne by Nektaria Anastasiadou (Hoopoe, TP) Cultural Heritage, Women’s Fiction

The Seed Keeper by Diane Wilson (Milkweed Editions, TP) Native American History, Aboriginal History, Nature & the Environment

The Son of the House by Cheluchi Onyemelukwe-Onuobia (Dundurn Group, TP) Literary, Women’s Fiction, Cultural Heritage

The Third Mrs. Galway by Deirdre Sinnott (Kaylie Jones Books, HC) Hist. Fiction, Civil War Era, Women’s Fiction

When the Apricots Bloom by Gina Wilkinson (Kensington, TP) Biographical Fiction, Middle Eastern

Why Birds Sing by Nina Berkhout (ECW Press, TP) Family Life, Women’s Fiction

 

I LOVE READING! HOW DO I FIND OUT ABOUT JOINING THE COMMITTEE? Contact GGR Chair Kristen Knox, at KKnox.NatlReadingGrpMonth@gmail.com  *Note, you must be a full-paid up Member to serve.

A Statement From The WNBA National Board (June 2020)

Our country has been shaken over the past few weeks and months. Racial injustice, a global pandemic, and widespread economic concerns have all reached a tipping point. People are angry, frightened, and hurting. 

The Women’s National Book Association stands with those mourning the senseless killing of George Floyd and the countless other Black lives lost needlessly. We join the voices calling for change, and we call on the members of the WNBA to support one another in a shared fight to end racism, injustice, and inequity.

 

We support those who speak out against racial injustice and those who tell their stories. Silence is not an option. Inactivity is not an option. Ignorance is not an option. While reading a book will not magically solve the problems of the world, it is a place to start. When we read, we learn, we grow, and we think. We become more empathetic. As booklovers,we believe in the power of the written word to spark change. And change needs to happen.

 

Reading about racism, prejudice, bigotry, and hate gives us a foundation. The more we know, the better we can recognize and fight injustice. Reading books by people of color — especially women of color — allows us to not only support them but also amplify their voices.

 

Our association was founded on the principle of inclusivity. It is in the WNBA’s DNA to support people dismissed by those in power. Our tagline states our purpose clearly: Connecting, educating, advocating, and leading since 1917. The Women’s National Book Association will continue to connect, educate, advocate, and lead as we strive to provide a safe and inclusive community for booklovers. We recognize that the work is ongoing. As long as people are still angry, afraid, and hurting, we will keep fighting.

 

We urge our WNBA community to listen. Learn. Think. Empathize. Act. By joining together in the fight for justice, by actively promoting diversity and inclusivity, and by using our voices to call for change, we can make a positive difference.

Sincerely,

The Women’s National Book Association Board

Visit our Readers Against Racism list on Bookshop.

📚PDF

National Poetry Month: Crow’s Feet by Nicole C. Ayers

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the poetry and prose from our Members.

 

Crow’s Feet

by Nicole C. Ayers

(Illustration by Mica Gadhia)

 

Thank you for reflecting my life’s joys to the world. I love the idea that my smiles and laughter create creases that hold happiness in my eyes so I may “see” it. Some people call you laugh lines, and while I like that too, I like crow’s feet more. Crows are so intelligent, and they love shiny treasures. I like thinking I’m wise enough to find my treasure in joy. Love, ME

 

 

Dear Crow’s Feet

 

Nicole’s Love Notes collection is a trio of essays, inspirational prose, and a guided journal for the reader. They include Love Notes to My Body, Love Letters to My Body: Writing My Way to (Self-), and Writing Your Way to (Self-)Love: A Guided Journal To Help You Love Your Body, One Part at a Time. Visit her at www.nicolecayers.com And follow Mica on Twitter @MicaGadhia

National Poetry Month 2020: Los Angeles 2025 by Sarah Archer

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the Poetry and prose from our Members.

Los Angeles, 2025
by Sarah Archer 

The car door parts for you like lips.
All night this vessel has sketched a silver web
over the contained chaos of L.A., taking fares like lovers.
You are not the only one this hour, or on this corner;
a queue of feet bisects the block,
each pair’s face lit by its hand’s cool, compartmentalized glow.

Each man to machine neatly assigned,
algorithmic fate, calculated invisibly in the emptiness above your heads,
triangulated in the stars.
Yours murmurs you down the street on a current and a spell.

The city is gussied up tonight:
the street signs slick and skinny, the all-night
donuts awning hot, tawdry pink. Bars wink
from the strings of unlit storefronts like gold
in a fortune teller’s bow of teeth.
A rare recent rain has slicked motor oil to the skin
of the asphalt.  It glimmers off the curves
of Melrose like the tips of cigarettes.
Each scene flames out in a frame.

And everywhere the cars are streaming, gliding,
they zip perfectly around parabolas as if magnetized to a track,
they are clean as needles, dazzling in their voltaic wills,
they are everyone’s and no one’s,
they conceal us.

It feels good to own nothing,
you are pure, sanitary, as empty as a reflection.
You leave nothing but air.

Sarah Archer’s first novel, The Plus One was published in July 2019, by G.P. Putnam’s Sons. Follow Sarah on Twitter @SarahArcherM

 

Book Club Meetup: Tuesday, January 7th

C2638D58-0314-4BCD-A8EB-38DBFD093096Come and discuss Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner (Atria) 
Tuesday, January 7th, 7:00pm
Panera Bread, 5940 Fairview Rd., Charlotte, NC.

Synopsis: Growing up in 1950s Detroit, they live in a perfect “Dick and Jane” house, where their roles in the family are clearly defined. Jo is the tomboy, the bookish rebel with a passion to make the world more fair; Bethie is the pretty, feminine good girl, a would-be star who enjoys the power her beauty confers and dreams of a traditional life. But the truth ends up looking different from what the girls imagined. Jo and Bethie survive traumas and tragedies, and neither sister inhabit the world she dreams of, or a life that feels authentic or joyful. Is it too late for the women to finally stake a claim on happily ever after?

All are welcome to attend, to give your input or learn about a new book to read!

 

😊 📚 All titles for our bookclub are selected from WNBA’s Great Group Reads List.
Interested in knowing more about that committee? Contact Kristen Knox, KKnox.NatlReadingGrpMonth@gmail.com

Book Club Meetup: Tuesday, November 5th

Tomorrow'sBread MayhewCome and discuss Tomorrow’s Bread by Anna Jean Mayhew (Kensington Books)
Tuesday, November 5th, 7:00pm
Panera Bread, 5940 Fairview Rd., Charlotte, NC

ABOUT CHARLOTTE HISTORY, Y’ALL!
In 1961 Charlotte, North Carolina, the predominantly black neighborhood of Brooklyn is a bustling city within a city. Self-contained and vibrant, it has its own restaurants, schools, theaters, churches, and night clubs. There are shotgun shacks and poverty, along with well-maintained houses like the one Loraylee Hawkins shares with her young son, Hawk, her Uncle Ray, and her grandmother, Bibi. Loraylee’s love for Archibald Griffin, Hawk’s white father and manager of the cafeteria where she works, must be kept secret in the segregated South.

Loraylee has heard rumors that the city plans to bulldoze her neighborhood, claiming it’s dilapidated and dangerous. The government promises to provide new housing and relocate businesses. But locals like Pastor Ebenezer Polk, who’s facing the demolition of his church, know the value of Brooklyn does not lie in bricks and mortar.

 Please come, whether you’ve read / liked the book or not!

All titles for our bookclub are selected from WNBA’s Great Group Reads List. Interested in knowing more about that committee? Contact Kristen Knox, KKnox.NatlReadingGrpMonth@gmail.com

 

Member Mondays – Carolyn Snow Abiad

Member Mondays is a new feature on the Women’s National Book Association- Charlotte blog. Interviews are allotted on a first-come, first-served basis. We plan to cycle through all members each year. Special highlight posts for members with new publications or announcements are available on an ongoing basis.

This week, we have WNBA Membership Chair, Carolyn Snow Abiad.

About Carolyn:

Having once lived in Turkey, I love writing about eastern culture and myth. Today I lives in North Carolina with my husband, two sons, and nine koi fish. While my last name translates to “Snow White,” I have not yet written a memoir featuring an evil stepmother.

Do you prefer ebook, paperback or hardcover?

While I definitely prefer hardcover, I find myself reading more and more on my e-reader, and even on my iPhone. Ebooks are a convenient way to sneak in a few chapters while I’m waiting for my kids.

What are your reading habits?

I read about one fiction title per week. I also keep a non-fiction title on my nightstand, and that takes about a month to finish.

What book are you currently reading?

THE DIVINERS by Libba Bray. Set in the 1920s, this Young Adult story features murder, magical realism, and a good dose of romance. My non-fiction title for this month is WIRED FOR STORY by Lisa Cron.

One YA title that I think everyone can read is CODE NAME VERITY by Elizabeth Wein. It’s the story of two unconventional girls: one a WW II pilot, the other a spy. Try it!

Where can other WNBA members connect with you?

I keep a blog at www.CarolynSnowAbiad.com, I use Goodreads as Carolyn Abiad, and I’m on Twitter at @csabiad.