A Statement From The WNBA National Board (June 2020)

Our country has been shaken over the past few weeks and months. Racial injustice, a global pandemic, and widespread economic concerns have all reached a tipping point. People are angry, frightened, and hurting. 

The Women’s National Book Association stands with those mourning the senseless killing of George Floyd and the countless other Black lives lost needlessly. We join the voices calling for change, and we call on the members of the WNBA to support one another in a shared fight to end racism, injustice, and inequity.

 

We support those who speak out against racial injustice and those who tell their stories. Silence is not an option. Inactivity is not an option. Ignorance is not an option. While reading a book will not magically solve the problems of the world, it is a place to start. When we read, we learn, we grow, and we think. We become more empathetic. As booklovers,we believe in the power of the written word to spark change. And change needs to happen.

 

Reading about racism, prejudice, bigotry, and hate gives us a foundation. The more we know, the better we can recognize and fight injustice. Reading books by people of color — especially women of color — allows us to not only support them but also amplify their voices.

 

Our association was founded on the principle of inclusivity. It is in the WNBA’s DNA to support people dismissed by those in power. Our tagline states our purpose clearly: Connecting, educating, advocating, and leading since 1917. The Women’s National Book Association will continue to connect, educate, advocate, and lead as we strive to provide a safe and inclusive community for booklovers. We recognize that the work is ongoing. As long as people are still angry, afraid, and hurting, we will keep fighting.

 

We urge our WNBA community to listen. Learn. Think. Empathize. Act. By joining together in the fight for justice, by actively promoting diversity and inclusivity, and by using our voices to call for change, we can make a positive difference.

Sincerely,

The Women’s National Book Association Board

Visit our Readers Against Racism list on Bookshop.

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National Poetry Month: Crow’s Feet by Nicole C. Ayers

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the poetry and prose from our Members.

 

Crow’s Feet

by Nicole C. Ayers

(Illustration by Mica Gadhia)

 

Thank you for reflecting my life’s joys to the world. I love the idea that my smiles and laughter create creases that hold happiness in my eyes so I may “see” it. Some people call you laugh lines, and while I like that too, I like crow’s feet more. Crows are so intelligent, and they love shiny treasures. I like thinking I’m wise enough to find my treasure in joy. Love, ME

 

 

Dear Crow’s Feet

 

Nicole’s Love Notes collection is a trio of essays, inspirational prose, and a guided journal for the reader. They include Love Notes to My Body, Love Letters to My Body: Writing My Way to (Self-), and Writing Your Way to (Self-)Love: A Guided Journal To Help You Love Your Body, One Part at a Time. Visit her at www.nicolecayers.com And follow Mica on Twitter @MicaGadhia

National Poetry Month 2020: Los Angeles 2025 by Sarah Archer

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the Poetry and prose from our Members.

Los Angeles, 2025
by Sarah Archer 

The car door parts for you like lips.
All night this vessel has sketched a silver web
over the contained chaos of L.A., taking fares like lovers.
You are not the only one this hour, or on this corner;
a queue of feet bisects the block,
each pair’s face lit by its hand’s cool, compartmentalized glow.

Each man to machine neatly assigned,
algorithmic fate, calculated invisibly in the emptiness above your heads,
triangulated in the stars.
Yours murmurs you down the street on a current and a spell.

The city is gussied up tonight:
the street signs slick and skinny, the all-night
donuts awning hot, tawdry pink. Bars wink
from the strings of unlit storefronts like gold
in a fortune teller’s bow of teeth.
A rare recent rain has slicked motor oil to the skin
of the asphalt.  It glimmers off the curves
of Melrose like the tips of cigarettes.
Each scene flames out in a frame.

And everywhere the cars are streaming, gliding,
they zip perfectly around parabolas as if magnetized to a track,
they are clean as needles, dazzling in their voltaic wills,
they are everyone’s and no one’s,
they conceal us.

It feels good to own nothing,
you are pure, sanitary, as empty as a reflection.
You leave nothing but air.

Sarah Archer’s first novel, The Plus One was published in July 2019, by G.P. Putnam’s Sons. Follow Sarah on Twitter @SarahArcherM

 

Book Club Meetup: Tuesday, January 7th

C2638D58-0314-4BCD-A8EB-38DBFD093096Come and discuss Mrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner (Atria) 
Tuesday, January 7th, 7:00pm
Panera Bread, 5940 Fairview Rd., Charlotte, NC.

Synopsis: Growing up in 1950s Detroit, they live in a perfect “Dick and Jane” house, where their roles in the family are clearly defined. Jo is the tomboy, the bookish rebel with a passion to make the world more fair; Bethie is the pretty, feminine good girl, a would-be star who enjoys the power her beauty confers and dreams of a traditional life. But the truth ends up looking different from what the girls imagined. Jo and Bethie survive traumas and tragedies, and neither sister inhabit the world she dreams of, or a life that feels authentic or joyful. Is it too late for the women to finally stake a claim on happily ever after?

All are welcome to attend, to give your input or learn about a new book to read!

 

😊 📚 All titles for our bookclub are selected from WNBA’s Great Group Reads List.
Interested in knowing more about that committee? Contact Kristen Knox, KKnox.NatlReadingGrpMonth@gmail.com

Book Club Meetup: Tuesday, November 5th

Tomorrow'sBread MayhewCome and discuss Tomorrow’s Bread by Anna Jean Mayhew (Kensington Books)
Tuesday, November 5th, 7:00pm
Panera Bread, 5940 Fairview Rd., Charlotte, NC

ABOUT CHARLOTTE HISTORY, Y’ALL!
In 1961 Charlotte, North Carolina, the predominantly black neighborhood of Brooklyn is a bustling city within a city. Self-contained and vibrant, it has its own restaurants, schools, theaters, churches, and night clubs. There are shotgun shacks and poverty, along with well-maintained houses like the one Loraylee Hawkins shares with her young son, Hawk, her Uncle Ray, and her grandmother, Bibi. Loraylee’s love for Archibald Griffin, Hawk’s white father and manager of the cafeteria where she works, must be kept secret in the segregated South.

Loraylee has heard rumors that the city plans to bulldoze her neighborhood, claiming it’s dilapidated and dangerous. The government promises to provide new housing and relocate businesses. But locals like Pastor Ebenezer Polk, who’s facing the demolition of his church, know the value of Brooklyn does not lie in bricks and mortar.

 Please come, whether you’ve read / liked the book or not!

All titles for our bookclub are selected from WNBA’s Great Group Reads List. Interested in knowing more about that committee? Contact Kristen Knox, KKnox.NatlReadingGrpMonth@gmail.com

 

Member Mondays – Carolyn Snow Abiad

Member Mondays is a new feature on the Women’s National Book Association- Charlotte blog. Interviews are allotted on a first-come, first-served basis. We plan to cycle through all members each year. Special highlight posts for members with new publications or announcements are available on an ongoing basis.

This week, we have WNBA Membership Chair, Carolyn Snow Abiad.

About Carolyn:

Having once lived in Turkey, I love writing about eastern culture and myth. Today I lives in North Carolina with my husband, two sons, and nine koi fish. While my last name translates to “Snow White,” I have not yet written a memoir featuring an evil stepmother.

Do you prefer ebook, paperback or hardcover?

While I definitely prefer hardcover, I find myself reading more and more on my e-reader, and even on my iPhone. Ebooks are a convenient way to sneak in a few chapters while I’m waiting for my kids.

What are your reading habits?

I read about one fiction title per week. I also keep a non-fiction title on my nightstand, and that takes about a month to finish.

What book are you currently reading?

THE DIVINERS by Libba Bray. Set in the 1920s, this Young Adult story features murder, magical realism, and a good dose of romance. My non-fiction title for this month is WIRED FOR STORY by Lisa Cron.

One YA title that I think everyone can read is CODE NAME VERITY by Elizabeth Wein. It’s the story of two unconventional girls: one a WW II pilot, the other a spy. Try it!

Where can other WNBA members connect with you?

I keep a blog at www.CarolynSnowAbiad.com, I use Goodreads as Carolyn Abiad, and I’m on Twitter at @csabiad.