A Statement From The WNBA National Board (June 2020)

Our country has been shaken over the past few weeks and months. Racial injustice, a global pandemic, and widespread economic concerns have all reached a tipping point. People are angry, frightened, and hurting. 

The Women’s National Book Association stands with those mourning the senseless killing of George Floyd and the countless other Black lives lost needlessly. We join the voices calling for change, and we call on the members of the WNBA to support one another in a shared fight to end racism, injustice, and inequity.

 

We support those who speak out against racial injustice and those who tell their stories. Silence is not an option. Inactivity is not an option. Ignorance is not an option. While reading a book will not magically solve the problems of the world, it is a place to start. When we read, we learn, we grow, and we think. We become more empathetic. As booklovers,we believe in the power of the written word to spark change. And change needs to happen.

 

Reading about racism, prejudice, bigotry, and hate gives us a foundation. The more we know, the better we can recognize and fight injustice. Reading books by people of color — especially women of color — allows us to not only support them but also amplify their voices.

 

Our association was founded on the principle of inclusivity. It is in the WNBA’s DNA to support people dismissed by those in power. Our tagline states our purpose clearly: Connecting, educating, advocating, and leading since 1917. The Women’s National Book Association will continue to connect, educate, advocate, and lead as we strive to provide a safe and inclusive community for booklovers. We recognize that the work is ongoing. As long as people are still angry, afraid, and hurting, we will keep fighting.

 

We urge our WNBA community to listen. Learn. Think. Empathize. Act. By joining together in the fight for justice, by actively promoting diversity and inclusivity, and by using our voices to call for change, we can make a positive difference.

Sincerely,

The Women’s National Book Association Board

Visit our Readers Against Racism list on Bookshop.

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Book Club VIRTUAL Meetup June 2nd

Come and discuss The Girls at 17 Swann Street by Yara Zgheib (St. Martin’s, TP) 
Tuesday, June 2, 7:00pm
Virtually, on Zoom (rsvp)  

Synopsis: Anna Roux was a professional dancer who followed the man of her dreams from Paris to Missouri. There, alone with her biggest fears – imperfection, failure, loneliness – she spirals down anorexia and depression till she weighs a mere eighty-eight pounds. Forced to seek treatment, she is admitted into 17 Swann Street, a center for women with life-threatening eating disorders. Every bite causes anxiety. Every flavor induces guilt. And every step Anna takes toward recovery will require strength, endurance, and the support of the girls at 17 Swann Street.

All are welcome to attend, to give your input or learn about a new book to read!

😊 📚 All titles for our bookclub are selected from WNBA’s Great Group Reads List.

National Poetry Month: Covid-19 by NC Weil

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the poetry and prose from WNBA Members.

COVID-19
by NC Weil
Coronavirus is the new malaria
Invisible contagion in a sneeze,
An end to sociability and ease,
Undercurrent of some new hysteria.
Hoping that this new threat doesn’t bury ya
You twitch and start at every cough and wheeze,
Praying this is not the dread disease –
Hospital reports are very scary, yeah!
Seeking to be safe, we wear our masks
And grocery shop in one-use latex gloves
Staying in, reordering our tasks,
Zooming visits to our distant loves.
We’ll get through this together, being kind,
The greater good the forefront of our mind.

 

NC Weil (WNBA-DC Chapter) is a writer and author of the novels Karmafornia and Superball (Fool Court Press, 2016). Follow her blog at http://aestheticpoint.blogspot.com

National Poetry Month: My Mother’s Left Hand by Linda Vigen Phillips

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the poetry and prose from our Members.

MY MOTHER’S LEFT HAND
by Linda Vigen Phillips

She never once raised it to me, to attempt discipline.

The ugly rash on her wrist required constant scratching.

She applied cream and sat in her chair.

She was still able to light up.

That left three fingers for scratching.

I sat at her feet.

They itched sometimes, too.

Can you play?

Not now.

Oh.

 

Linda is the author of two Young Adult novels-in-verse: Behind These Hands (Light Messages, 2018) and Crazy (Eerdmans, 2014),  Follow her on Twitter @LVigenPhillips

 

National Poetry Month: Crow’s Feet by Nicole C. Ayers

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the poetry and prose from our Members.

 

Crow’s Feet

by Nicole C. Ayers

(Illustration by Mica Gadhia)

 

Thank you for reflecting my life’s joys to the world. I love the idea that my smiles and laughter create creases that hold happiness in my eyes so I may “see” it. Some people call you laugh lines, and while I like that too, I like crow’s feet more. Crows are so intelligent, and they love shiny treasures. I like thinking I’m wise enough to find my treasure in joy. Love, ME

 

 

Dear Crow’s Feet

 

Nicole’s Love Notes collection is a trio of essays, inspirational prose, and a guided journal for the reader. They include Love Notes to My Body, Love Letters to My Body: Writing My Way to (Self-), and Writing Your Way to (Self-)Love: A Guided Journal To Help You Love Your Body, One Part at a Time. Visit her at www.nicolecayers.com And follow Mica on Twitter @MicaGadhia

National Poetry Month 2020: Contagion by Linda Vigen Phillips

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the poetry and prose from our Members.

CONTAGION
by Linda Vigen Phillips

I can smell the poetry

in the air

everywhere, and be careful

it is contagious.

I explored the streets without cover

and oh my,

I did discover things without

and within.

Wisteria grabbed my nose

on a walk

usually brisk, but now the gift of time

demands my attention, a twist.

A disturbance overhead, I hear

two hawks

frenzied by two ravens

too curious about the nest.

Squirrels, always squirrely

can be ignored

but wait, a symphony

inside my head choreographs their dance.

I came down with it,

the poetry.

An infectious smile

invades my languid soul.

Linda is the author of two Young Adult novels-in-verse: Behind These Hands (Light Messages, 2018) and Crazy (Eerdmans, 2014),  Follow her on Twitter @LVigenPhillips

 

National Poetry Month 2020: Los Angeles 2025 by Sarah Archer

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the Poetry and prose from our Members.

Los Angeles, 2025
by Sarah Archer 

The car door parts for you like lips.
All night this vessel has sketched a silver web
over the contained chaos of L.A., taking fares like lovers.
You are not the only one this hour, or on this corner;
a queue of feet bisects the block,
each pair’s face lit by its hand’s cool, compartmentalized glow.

Each man to machine neatly assigned,
algorithmic fate, calculated invisibly in the emptiness above your heads,
triangulated in the stars.
Yours murmurs you down the street on a current and a spell.

The city is gussied up tonight:
the street signs slick and skinny, the all-night
donuts awning hot, tawdry pink. Bars wink
from the strings of unlit storefronts like gold
in a fortune teller’s bow of teeth.
A rare recent rain has slicked motor oil to the skin
of the asphalt.  It glimmers off the curves
of Melrose like the tips of cigarettes.
Each scene flames out in a frame.

And everywhere the cars are streaming, gliding,
they zip perfectly around parabolas as if magnetized to a track,
they are clean as needles, dazzling in their voltaic wills,
they are everyone’s and no one’s,
they conceal us.

It feels good to own nothing,
you are pure, sanitary, as empty as a reflection.
You leave nothing but air.

Sarah Archer’s first novel, The Plus One was published in July 2019, by G.P. Putnam’s Sons. Follow Sarah on Twitter @SarahArcherM

 

National Poetry Month 2020: Trolls by Sarah Thompson

For National Poetry Month 2020, we present the Poetry and prose from our Members.

TROLLS
by Sarah Thompson

A troll controls my backpack
So that he can hitch a ride.
He should be guarding bridges,
But he says he’s occupied.


My troll demands a pittance
Every time I crack the top.
My back will break from pennies
If this troll won’t ever stop.


He eats my pens and pencils
Like my school supplies are snacks.
He dines on work for math class;
All that work I won’t get back!


He tears the strings from string cheese
When he breaks into my lunch.
He likes to drain my thermos
Of hot soup or icy punch.


He’s got to leave my book bag;
I won’t change my mind a smidge.
Rude trolls are not for backpacks . . .


Do you maybe have a bridge?

–from Sarah Thompson’s book Yard Art, A Collection of Children’s Poetry (Missing Goat Press, January 2020). Illustrated by Bree Stallings.
Follow Sarah Thompson on Twitter @authorFT

Join us March 9th for our Spring “Meet the Authors” Evening

park road books picJoin us for our
Spring Meet the Authors Evening
Monday, March 9th, 7:00 – 8:30 PM
at 
Park Road Books
4139 Park Rd, Charlotte

Join us for an evening of conversation with three prominent, southern-based authors, invited by the chapter.

(Author Bios & Book Summaries, click here)

 

Abigail DeWitt, author of News of Our Loved Ones (Harper Perennial TP)

 

 

 

 

 

Donna Everhart, author of The Moonshiners Daughter (Kensington, TP)

 

 

 

 

 

 Susan Beckham Zurenda, author of Bells for Eli (Mercer University Press HC)

 

 

Each will speak briefly about their new novels, then give opportunity for one-on-one questions and discussion.

We’ll have wine, refreshments, and a chance to mingle with the authors as well! For more info or questions, contact Susan Walker, susan.walker.books@gmail.com 

 

Book Club Meetup: Tuesday, March 3rd

last year of warCome and discuss The Last Year of the War by Susan Meissner (Berkeley, HC) 
Tuesday, March 3, 7:00pm
Panera Bread, 5940 Fairview Rd., Charlotte

Synopsis: A German American girl and a Japanese American girl sent to the same internment camp during WWII become close friends before each being repatriated, with their families, to the country of their parents, countries neither child has ever known, during the last years of the war. This is a fresh look at WWII and internment, one that might give us pause given the rising shadow of increased nationalism we’re seeing today.

All are welcome to attend, to give your input or learn about a new book to read!

😊 📚 All titles for our bookclub are selected from WNBA’s Great Group Reads List.